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Creatures are plaguing Atlanta, killing the magical beings and stealing their magic. When a wizard is killed in front of Logan Callaghan, a centuries-old Fey warrior, a war begins. A Witch from another plane will be the key to figuring out where these creatures come from and how to stop them. Add, in a few Fallen Angels and you have a battle unlike any before on this earth.

 

October 11

50 Ideas for Adding Action to Your Dialogue | Writing Tips

Do you want to make your dialogue sound more believable? Try these 50 ideas for adding action to your dialogue.Do you want to make your dialogue sound more believable? Try these 50 ideas for adding action to your dialogue.

When I first started writing, I never added action to my dialogue. I know, rookie mistake. I learned that lesson pretty early on. Adding an action in the middle of a conversion makes it more believable.

For example, if your main character is doing housework and someone interrupts her with a question, it is likely that she would pause to answer it, but if that question turns into a whole conversation, there’s a good probability that she would either quit her task and walk away (which she can do while talking) or continue scrubbing the tub while responding, therefore killing two birds with one stone.



Keeping action in a dialogue like this makes the characters seem more real. I can’t count how many times my husband or kids interrupted me while cleaning the house, and I don’t stop but for a moment—too much to do and too little time. Instead, I just answer their questions as best I can and keep on going.


Related Post: The One Tool I Use That Makes Me a Better Writer


Another way of doing this is by working in the details of the action. For example, the way the character was distracted by a stubborn spot before responding. Or, how annoyed the other character was by the sound of the scrubbing brush scraping along the side of the tub. There is an unlimited amount of ways to work the action in. Describing the details is a good way, or you can just mention that the character is performing the action, perhaps even as a way of avoiding the conversation.

There is an unlimited amount of ways to work the action in. Describing the details is a good way, or you can just mention that the character is performing the action, perhaps even as a way of avoiding the conversation.



Here is a list of actions that your characters can accomplish while still carrying on a conversion. Think of this as an idea board to get your own creative juices flowing.

50 Ideas for Adding Action to Your Dialogue

  1. Drinking coffee
  2. Watering the plants
  3. Cleaning up blood
  4. Packing a bag
  5. Rocking in a rocking chair
  6. Surfing the internet or doing another task on a computer
  7. Painting theirs or someone else’s nails
  8. Giving a massage
  9. Unpacking or searching through boxes
  10. Taking a shower
  11. Setting up a tent or makeshift shelter
  12. Changing a tire
  13. Browsing the aisle of a store or library
  14. Sparring
  15. Knitting, crocheting, or hand sewing
  16. Working on a car or motorcycle
  17. Shopping
  18. Feeding fish or another small animal in a cage or tank
  19. Folding clothes
  20. Cleaning a weapon
  21. Making a bed
  22. Playing cards or a board game
  23. Building and/or tending a fire
  24. Fighting
  25. Brushing their hair
  26. Walking the dog
  27. Hiking or walking through the woods
  28. Digging a grave
  29. Getting dressed/ trying on clothes
  30. Painting (a wall, mural, canvas)
  31. Working out
  32. Cooking
  33. Taking a bath or shower
  34. Washing Dishes
  35. Cleaning/dressing a wound
  36. Filing papers
  37. Changing a tire
  38. Decorating for a birthday or holiday
  39. Performing the actions of a spell
  40. Sharpening a knife or sword
  41. Changing a baby’s diaper
  42. Jogging
  43. Chewing gum/ blowing bubbles
  44. Scrapbooking
  45. Sweeping/vacuuming
  46. Raking leaves
  47. Cutting up meat (everyone loves a meat cleaver)
  48. Home improvement/ repairs
  49. Wrapping a gift
  50. Running an EMF meter through a haunted house

I hope these ideas spark your imagination and help liven up your story’s dialogue. Have you combined action with dialogue in a way that worked out nicely? Leave a comment and let us know about it.

 

 

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Sara

Hi! I’m author S. L. Gavyn. I’ve written over a dozen books and I want to help you reach your writing goals. Check out my writing tips to make the most of your writing career.

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